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Chords of the palo Taranta

Postby antoniobrandao » 05 Sep 2011, 00:24

Hello!

What are the chords for Tarantas ?

And what would be a correct progression to use them, to properly explore the spirit of this beautiful palo?

I just know they usually start with this one (below) and then play with something half tone above, and then come many others

-0-
-0-
-0-
-4-
-4
-2-

Greetings!
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Re: Chords of the palo Taranta

Postby SamC » 05 Sep 2011, 11:58

There are no set chords for Taranta, but most common used is to take the fingering for an E major chord on the 3rd fret, then use your index finger to play the bass notes. Start with the E6 open played with the thumb right hand, then arpeggio of your choice, then index on 2nd fret and repeat arpeggio. Slide up one fret and repeat. You can use tremolo using your index to play the bass note, then index down to the E1 string to play same note as on E6 just an octave higher. You can make up falsetas using corresponding scales. I play my taranta all improvised and from emotion. Remember the taranta is about underground mining and the tragedies associated with this occupation. It needs to be expressive. I hear many tarantas that are to pretty and sweet and sound like a classical recital. There is nothing pretty or sweet about underground mining and the taranta that originated with letra bemoaning the tragedy was heart breaking and haunting. A guitar soloist must capture this in my opinion or the palo is meaningless and not flamenco. Here are a couple of examples that I played. This is one palo I never play the same twice and have never written it down, so I have no tab for it and even I cannot play it again exactly like this again. First example is played open, 2nd with cejilla on 2nd fret.
Taranta.mp3

Taranta Tsiorba.mp3
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Re: Chords of the palo Taranta

Postby SamC » 05 Sep 2011, 12:15

Listen to the pain in her voice. The off harmony notes and the way they are drug into the harmony. A lot of descending arpeggios are used by dragging your ring finger from the E1 to E6 string. Ligato on the E6 string while holding the chords is common. The guitarist starts out with a bell sound, like bells ringing announcing a death. I like to start with the sound of rock falling. I worked in the underground mine for 13 years, so I have an idea of the sounds that are associated.

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Re: Chords of the palo Taranta

Postby SamC » 05 Sep 2011, 12:25

About 5 minutes in Melchor starts his taranta. It is my all time favorite.

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Re: Chords of the palo Taranta

Postby byron » 05 Sep 2011, 15:55

There's a good short summary here as well:

http://onlineguitaracademy.com/flamenco ... antas.html
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Re: Chords of the palo Taranta

Postby Roland » 07 Sep 2011, 03:32

antoniobrandao wrote:Hello!

What are the chords for Tarantas ?

And what would be a correct progression to use them, to properly explore the spirit of this beautiful palo?

I just know they usually start with this one (below) and then play with something half tone above, and then come many others


The basic progression is like that in fandango (Am, G7, F, E) but transposed 1 full tone higher: Bm, A7, G, F#. The central chord, as you suggested, is F#. The characteristic flavor of the palo depends on highly dissonant voicings often involving the use of open strings. F# the way you play it (the traditional way) has an open g, b, and e. So it is essentially a F#7 chord with a flat 9 and a 4 but neither major nor minor. You can replace the open g with an a-sharp (major 3rd) to restore the major character of the chord, then move your ring finger on the D-string to the 5th fret to get back the g. Also the G-chord is often altered. For example, move the g on the E-string to F and you have a G7 chord with the 7 in the bass. You can also approach F# through D7 (an alteration of Bm) followed by C#7 (the dominant 7 chord for F#). D7 here serves as a dominant 7 chord for C#. D7 (with F# in the bass) also is often used to resolve directly to G, creating an alternate key (G major) to F# phrygian (The only difference in notes between the keys is the c in G major instead of c sharp in F# phrygian). D is the parallel major substitution for Bm and can be preceded or followed by its dominant 7, which is A7. So, dominant 7 chords allow you to take excursions from the basic progression. Moreover, you can use triton substitutions for dominant 7 chords (eg, C#7 for G7) and parallel minor substitutions (Em for G). Because of the triton relationship, dominant 7 chords can resolve chromatically downward: D7 to C#7, G7 to F#. However, to sound authentic judicious use of chord voicings and melodic lines, phrasing, and articulation are more important than harmonic sophistication.
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Re: Chords of the palo Taranta

Postby AlVal » 17 Oct 2011, 07:18

Hi
guess anything can work really
some i use are
basic cycle
B7 -Em7 - A13 [b9] - Dmaj7 - Gmaj7 - C#7b9 - G7b5 to F#7b9 {home chord]
you could start at any point in this cycle

or

Bm9 - F#7b9 -x2 Bm9 = Aadd9 - Dmaj - Em9, Emin/maj7 - Bm9 - A7 - G7b5 to F#7b9 [home chord]
or a cadence to the home chord instead of the G7 could be
Em - Em/F -F#7b9 [home chord]


this is very functional harmony but can go anywhere from there..the tritone substitutions work well as mentioned...
all 7th chords can be 9ths, 13ths sus and alterations
all Major chords can be maj 7 or 9 or 6 or #11 or #5
all minor chords can be 9ths, sus, maj7 etc or can be voiced as Dom7th chords depending on the melodic line....
let me know if you want a video upload to help you along
Cheers
Al
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